Category Archives: Community

Nice to be back!

As indicated in the Term 1 newsletter I was granted a sabbatical by the Ministry of Education for Term 2 which is available to Principal’s after 5 years of service (mine was delayed by a year). I wish to thank the Board of Trustees for supporting my application and our Associate Principal for stepping into my position while I was away. The topic I was investigating, was “Principal’s Wellbeing” which together with student and teacher wellbeing is becoming a very important consideration for Boards of Trustees and the Ministry of Education.

Following an analysis of responses by over 50 school leaders in Auckland and meetings with a selected number I was able to summarise some broad generalisations which I have shared with colleagues and Principal organisations. Some of the reasons why Principal’s indicate they are thriving in their role, rather than surviving, is due to the support they receive from their Boards and their Board Chair in particular; their Senior Leaders and the community generally. I am pleased to say I fit in that category and wish again to thank everyone who has contributed in some way to my feelings of wellbeing. I realise this is a personal statement which I am unused to sharing, however a school leader faces numerous complex issues on a daily basis and this can be draining unless there are other factors which help to “refill the bucket”.

Being back at school and reconnecting with our wonderful staff, student and parent community has been a most enjoyable experience. It is often true to say that when we are away or leave a place we tend to appreciate things more and this was true for me when I was away and witnessed through facebook and emails the amazing efforts of our staff to maintain our mission of helping students to find and grow their greatness.

I trust everyone is well and like me, feels blessed that we are able to enjoy personal freedoms that many in other countries are denied owing to the pandemic. I look forward to sharing with you all the events and celebrations we have become used to in term 3 and beyond.

Growing greatness – Kia mana ake!

COVID update 28 Feb 2021

Following the PM announcement that Auckland is at alert level 3 for the week starting Monday 1 March, please note that, as before, the school is closed until further notice except for students of parents of “essential” services. If your child/ren need/s supervision at school please notify the relevant Whānau Leader before 5 pm today so arrangements can be made.
These students are to report directly to the library and have lunch, charged device and other learning equipment with them. Masks are recommended but not compulsory.
The rest of the school will kick into distance learning and further information will be sent to students via the Whānau Leaders.
While this is frustrating it is necessary and we thank you once again for your patience and support.
Kia kaha
Ian Morrison

 

Transition

SPECIAL REPORT: Starting Year 7

Starting Year 7 poses many new challenges, but also offers exciting opportunities. It comes with a number of mixed feelings. Unfortunately for many Year 6 students, 2020 was marred with school closures and remote learning due to the pandemic and the overall impact of this is still unknown.

For many students regular orientation activities at the end of 2020 were less than ideal. Therefore, many students may be feeling a little bit more anxious than usual about their expectations of starting Year 7. Grasping new skills and establishing new study practices can quickly become daunting and overwhelming.

During this time of transition, parents and carers need to be supportive, but also realistic in their expectations. This is an important milestone in your child’s life. There will be feelings of exhilaration, but also the fear of the unknown. Therefore it will be important for parents and carers to be vigilant in monitoring their child’s mood and mental health during this time. They could easily become overly anxious or even depressed.

In this Special Report, there are a number of strategies offered that can make this transition period smoother and start things off on the right foot! We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this Special Report, and as always, we welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Here is the link to your special report https://mhjc.nz.schooltv.me/wellbeing_news/special-report-transition-high-school

This month on SchoolTV – Raising Boys

Many parents will attest to the fact that many boys are active, loud, rambunctious and prone to rough play, but this should not affect how a parent acts towards their son. Be careful not to pigeon-hole your son into gender specific behaviours or gender roles. The male brain is distinctly differently in its development. A boy’s physical maturity is often at odds with his mental and brain development.

Societal beliefs about how to raise boys can sometimes influence their adult carers. Although we are not determined by our biology, it is a factor. It is important to support boys in their natural tendencies and nurture their strengths and abilities. Teach them the skills they need for their future and to develop a healthy identity. It is important for boys to have a role model they can connect with and acknowledge who they are. One of the most important determinants for a boy’s development is how secure they feel growing up.

In this edition of SchoolTV, adult carers will gain a better understanding into some of the more complex issues relating to raising boys. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month’s edition, and we always welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Here is the link to this month’s edition https://mhjc.nz.schooltv.me/newsletter/raising-boys

MHJC community shows awhinatanga

One of our core values is compassion/awhinatanga and we are proud of the way our community responded to our charity drives recently and lived our values.

Our annual poppy day collections were disrupted by the lockdown however we had a mufti day and raised $1200 for the Howick RSA.

The Student Executive Council also started a Give a Little page which raised $500 for the Salvation Army food bank. This is in addition to the work of student leaders who collected cans for the Salvation Army and everyone involved in the World Vision 40 hour famine appeal which raised $10000.

Many thanks to everyone who supported these charity drives.

 

 

Fund raiser for families experiencing hardship.

Our Student Executive Council has set up a Give a Little page to raise funds for the Salvation Army. This is their response to the hardship that many people are experiencing following lockdown. We realise that many of our own families may not be in a position to contribute to the page but hope that others might contribute any amount for this worthy cause. Please share with family and friends.

Here is the link: https://givealittle.co.nz/search?q=MHJC

SchoolTV – SPECIAL REPORT: Coronavirus – The Transition Back

Here is the latest advice from SchoolTV

As lockdown restrictions are slowly being lifted to varying degrees, we enter a time of transition and adjustment. The circumstances of this situation have significantly impacted us all. For some it has been an opportunity to reflect on what is important, whilst others have embraced the opportunity to learn new things.

Many young people may be excited at the prospect of restrictions being lifted; others may feel mixed emotions. Reactions will differ depending on how well they cope with stress and change. Keeping a check on your child’s mental health and wellbeing as they adjust to new routines, will be vitally important.

There is still a lot of uncertainty ahead of us, so focusing on the things you can control or enjoy doing or even value, can help establish predictability and familiarity for the whole family. Adult carers need to provide young people with reassurance by acknowledging any concerns and fears they may have at this time. Consider this to be a normal reaction, however it may be best to focus more on their feelings and emotions, rather than the practicalities at this stage.

In this Special Report, we share a few ideas to help ease this time of transition and adjustment. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this Special Report, and as always, we welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Here is the link to your special report https://mhjc.nz.schooltv.me/wellbeing_news/special-report-coronavirus-transition-back