Category Archives: Learning @ MHJC

The Junior College Advantage

Students at Mission Heights Junior College enjoy many opportunities and are able to learn in an environment which has been specially designed for students of this cohort or age range.

The four year transition from primary to senior secondary school has distinct advantages:

Instead of a two year, which some refer to as the “revolving door” experience of an intermediate school where it is difficult to establish strong relationships in such a short time, teachers are able to get to know and support our students over four years.

Positive and caring relationships are the key to positive well-being and academic achievement.

The whanau structure of the school or schools within schools model further increases the quality of the relationship as students usually remain in the same whanau the whole time and with the same Learning Advisor and Senior Leaders. Having only 200 students in each whanau led by two experienced senior leaders ensures personalised and individual attention.

The middle college years are important for maturation and the building of a strong personal identity. Being grouped together at a time when they are neither primary nor senior secondary is a distinct advantage at this stage of their personal development. Being shielded for two years from some of the negative influences of senior students to which Year 9 and 10 students at senior colleges are exposed is an obvious benefit to our students at this impressionable age.

Positive friendships are also important factors for wellbeing and achievement. So it would be an advantage for students to transition to a senior college together from a junior college rather than disconnect before the end of Year 10.

Our students are able to grow without the constraints of having older students above them. We see incredible confidence and maturity in our senior students as they are the leaders of the school and occupy leadership positions that would normally be taken by Year 11, 12 or 13 students in a senior college. The image of trees fighting for sunlight in a forest comes to mind – our students can grow taller and stronger without a canopy above them.

Our curriculum has been carefully designed to ensure students receive specialist teaching from Year 7 to 10. Our students, having received excellent general foundations at primary school are ready for the next phase of specialised teaching. They are taught by a range of expert teachers rather than one home room teacher as in an intermediate school who may or may not have the same skills across all learning areas. The integrated curriculum learnt within a context is also enjoyed by students who can see the relevance of their learning in the real world.

Crucially students are able to receive the undivided attention of our teachers who are not distracted by the work-load of NCEA or CIE assessment which starts in Year 11 and continues to Year 13. Many of our teachers comment on how refreshing it is to return to the true meaning of discovery learning rather than “learning for assessment” required by senior courses and our students benefit as a result.

We believe that our students are well prepared for senior college and while gathering credits for NCEA is not our core business we do give our Year 10 students an opportunity to attempt achievement standards in most of their subjects. This gives them a taste of the NCEA process and an opportunity to carry some credits into Year 11.

Digital Learning & BYOD

At Mission Heights Junior College,  we are excited to move into the next phase of growth in the school, which is the introduction of BYOD in the school in 2017. This follows the introduction of Google Apps for Education to the school in 2014 and the Chromebook e-Pedagogy trial in 2016.

Below is some pertinent information for parents and students. This information will be updated from time to time.

Slides from the Netsafe Evening 2017

Digital Learning

Mission Heights Junior College students use a range of online digital learning platforms to complement their in-class work;

  • Maths Buddy – Maths Buddy gives students the freedom to study without stress in their own time, at their own pace. It allows students to catch up on lessons they missed or concepts they have not fully understood. Every student has access to the entire Year 1 to 13 curriculum so students can revise and reinforce concepts they have learned earlier.
  • Reading Plus – Reading Plus helps students to become better readers by developing the skills they need to read proficiently and become independent learners. Using Reading Plus regularly improves student comprehension and reading speed.
  • Write That Essay – Write that Essay uses a combination of teaching modules and scaffolded writing tools to improve students’ independent writing abilities. Teachers differentiate access to the site so that students are targeted at a level that suits their writing abilities.

We also make extensive use of the Google G-Suite for Education platform to allow for excellent collaboration between students and teachers.

Digital Citizenship

The Ministry of Education has created an excellent resource on Digital Citizenship. This resource is available at the link below;

http://elearning.tki.org.nz/Professional-learning/Digital-citizenship-modules

BYOD Frequently Asked Questions

What are the advantages of BYOD?

  • Anytime, anywhere access to class resources and support through Google Apps, MHJC Online and other cloud based applications.
  • The ability to create a personal digital portfolio of their own work using cloud based applications such as TinkerCAD and LucidChart

How does BYOD change education?

  • Increased engagement in the learning process as students become more active participants in their learning.
  • Greater ability to communicate with teachers and other students through access to student email.
  • The ability to draft, redraft and publish work.
  • Greater independence, collaboration with peers and personalised learning.
  • Improved critical thinking and development of multi-literacies.
  • Greater integration of technology and the use of digital learning tools that complement existing teaching programmes.
  • Improved innovation as the use of devices in the classroom evolves.

What device should I buy for my child? Why did you not mandate one device that all students would have?

We are brand agnostic and we recommend that all things being equal, parents purchase the most affordable device available. Our recommendations are listed in the Recommended Devices List below.

In addition, some of our students already have devices which they and their parents may wish to use. There is not one single device that is best for all students at all levels covering all subjects and activities – whatever we may have chosen would not be best suited for all students.

Exceptions are only granted in the following circumstances :-

a. ORS funded students

b. Student with existing assistive technologies mandated by the Ministry of Education.

Why can’t students use a phone?

Phones are well suited for communication tasks such as Whatsapp, voice calling and texting but ill-suited to heavy text, mind-mapping and spreadsheet data entry.

Why have you chosen all year levels for BYOD? Why can’t only Year 9s and 10s be enrolled into that program?

We have discovered that many of our students have BYOD or BYOD-like programs in their previous schools. This is a natural continuation for them and they can continue using their device as they progress through the year levels in MHJC.

I’m concerned about cost. Shouldn’t devices be provided by the school?

While the school could maintain a 2:1 ratio, it does not have the resources for a 1:1 student to computer ratio.

Buying a device for your child is a major decision and a significant outlay. A good quality device should last Years 7 to 10 at school and so this cost is spread over 4 years.

All students need their own device rather than the use of a shared device. This is because MHJC is integrating device use into many aspects of teaching and learning and your investment in a device will enhance learning outcomes for all students.

Wouldn’t it be easier for teachers/students if there was only one device? Won’t it be too hard/impossible for teachers to make use of such a variety of different machines? If they had one machine, they would be able to teach the students how to use it more efficiently.

It would certainly be easier for most teachers. However, one device will not be able to accommodate all learning areas. It also might be too restrictive or demanding for some students and families.

We are also of the view that the specific device is not the issue at hand; it is the task of educating that is more important. If we are writing an essay or analysing a pattern trend, the focus is on the content and not the word processor or spreadsheet program.

 Can students charge their device in school?

Currently, we have limited facilities for the charging of personal devices in the school. Students are required to charge their devices fully the night before. Parents are also advised to procure suitable rechargeable power packs for their child’s devices.

Will the school repair the device if it breaks? Does the school provide loan machines for students whose devices are broken?

The school does not have any authorised personnel who can repair devices. It is advantageous to purchase the device from a provider who can offer advice, service, loan out machines, repair and lease options to go along with the purchase of the device.

May the students use 3G/4G in addition to WiFi?

The Student Cybersafety User Agreement requires students only to use the school provided wifi. This is a safe and monitored network. Students are not allowed to use their 3G/4G data plan while on campus.

When using their personal device, can the student’s internet activity be followed by the teacher?

Yes, when the student is on our BYOD network. If a teacher witnesses a student on a website outside the auspices of the AUP, the procedures in the AUP guideline will be followed.

Which is better, a laptop or a tablet?

Laptops are generally larger, less portable, have lower battery life, built-in keyboard, but have a full operating system and more specialised functionality for advanced activities.

Tablets are generally more portable, have a longer battery life and are very good for communication and simple tasks. They are considered to be a ‘personal consumer device’ for consuming the product of other people’s work, such as information on the internet. They are not best suited to ones’ own work productivity, especially tasks requiring multiple screens, high processing power, memory or full applications. As such, we do not recommend tablets at all.

Touch screen laptops with tablet mode provide the best of both worlds regarding functionality, but are the most expensive option.

Do I need to purchase Microsoft Office software for my child?

No. We use Google Apps and LibreOffice exclusively in MHJC.

How many devices can my child use at school?

MHJC students can only register ONE device to the school’s WiFi network.

MHJC Recommended Devices

Recommended Devices

Devices listed below are recommended by MHJC as examples which would work well for students in the classroom. We are brand agnostic and do not recommend any brand over another.

Our only requirements are that the device must have a keyboard for typing, have a minimum screen size of 9.7 inches and have a battery life of at least 6 hours.

Please note for students considering taking the Digital Technology option in Year 9 and 10, a Windows or Mac laptop is necessary to run the software required. The school has NUC computers available for students in the Year 9 and 10 Digital Technology option who do not have Windows or Mac laptops.

Parents are free to make their own choice regarding a specific device, supplier, insurance, after sales service and maintenance of the device. Examples of such suppliers are PB Tech, Noel Leeming or Harvey Norman.

To obtain a school discount when ordering online from PB Tech; Click on New Customer, enter your personal details, the membership key is MHJC and login with your credentials. You can also download this PBTech brochure and bring it along to any PB Tech store.

For Harvey Norman, drop by any store with this HN brochure.

Example Device Specifications

Laptop

  • Windows operating system, SSD hard drive, 8GB RAM, touch screen and tablet mode (detachable / convertible keyboard)
  • Windows operating system, SSD hard drive, 8GB RAM, standard laptop form factor
  • MacBook Pro or MacBook Air with 8GB RAM, running macOS

Tablet

  • Samsung tablet, WiFi, 9.7 inches or larger with detachable keyboard
  • Nexus tablet, WiFi, 9.7 inches or larger with detachable keyboard
  • Apple iPad, WiFi, 9.7 inches or larger with detachable keyboard

Chromebook

  • ChromeOS, 4GB RAM, 16GB SSD

Ideally students should have a robust and efficient device to ensure that it will stand up to the requirements of school use and so we have not considered the lowest cost machines.

None of the devices in the list above have low end specifications, and are therefore not the cheapest available. It will be advisable to discuss the specifications of any machine with your chosen provider who will assist you in your purchase decision.

Year 10 Options

 

Year 10 Subject Options 2017

 

Please select 4 option subjects but you will only study 2.  This is because some Options may not be offered if only a few students select it, or some Option course may be over subscribed.

 

Please note the following selection restriction that is applicable to the Technology Options, and Visual Art/Design & Visual Communication.

 

Technology (Digital, Hard Material, Fabric, Food)

– students can select a maximum 1x technology subject within their first two choices

– students can select a maximum 1x technology subject within their two back up choices

 

Visual Arts and Design & Visual Communication

– students can select one of these subjects within their first two choices

 

Year 10 Business Studies

 

Business Studies enables you to look and appreciate the issues that challenge business in a rapidly changing world. As citizens it is important that you are able to make informed and rational decisions about business matters.

 

In Business Studies your year will be broken up into three sections; business studies, economics and accounting. This enables you to get a taster of each before heading into Level One.

 

In Business Studies you will be looking at different products, target markets and how they are sold. This will lead onto a NCEA Standard which allows you to gain 4 credits. Accounting will allow students to explore financial statements and make decisions about whether the business should continue or not. Finally, Economics will allow students to look into supply and demand.

 

Business contexts often offer opportunities to integrate learning across a number of different subjects or learning areas and has strong links to everyday life. Business Studies offers opportunities for practical and creative thinkers as well as for those interested in money!

 

Year 10 Media Studies

 

In Media Studies you will learn to explore media concepts with critical awareness and have practical experience in production work. This course can give you essential skills and expertise as you progress to senior Media Studies, and beyond.

 

You will develop the ability to communicate confidently as you work in production groups developing media products such as short films. You will develop flexibility, problem solving and openness to new ideas. You will experience “hands-on” use of technology such as cameras and digital editing software.

 

You will be able to critically interpret a wide range of media. Your group project experiences will enhance your problem solving skills and ability to use your creative skills to produce a finished product to fit a brief.

 

Year 10 Visual Arts

 

“The internet has created an explosion of opportunity for digital designers and multimedia artists”

This option focuses on practical art-making. In Visual Arts opportunities will be given for you to express yourself effectively and extend your range of skills, knowledge and techniques using a variety of media and processes. These may include drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture and design using both traditional and contemporary approaches.

You will be encouraged to use technologies, including emerging applications in digital media within your work.

 

You will also be required to keep a Visual Arts diary and can expect to be assessed both

formally and informally on your practical knowledge, understanding and skills throughout the

course. There will also be an opportunity to participate in a Level One NCEA Achievement standard which focuses on using a range of wet and dry media.

 

*This option is a prerequisite if you are considering taking Graphics at senior level, as Graphics is part of the Visual Arts programme – not to be confused with D.V.C.

 

http://www.studentartguide.com/articles/reasons-to-study-art

 

Year 10 Graphics (Design and Visual Communication)

Design and Visual Communication (DVC) is a main communication tool, it is an international language therefore, it enables students to show their ideas avoiding languages barriers.

The Year 10 DVC course lays the foundation for Year 11 DVC and future years and it is based on the Year 9 DVC course, though no previous experience is required to take this option, it is ideal as a continuation of Year 9 DVC.

DVC combines the important educational aspects of communication and creative problem solving. This course will give students the chance to develop their own solutions to realistic design problems through the application of a design process. They will also get the skills to precisely communicate their solutions, by applying a range of Graphics Modes;

  • Free hand sketching
  • Technical drawing
  • Rendering
  • Graphics softwares

It is directly related to the dramatic technological developments that have occurred in today’s society, and involves fields such as;

  • Architecture
  • Environment
  • Engineering
  • Technological
  • Media
  • Packaging

This is a course with the emphasis placed on creativity and individual choice, developed to meet the needs of today’s students and tomorrow’s citizens. The programme is developed around briefs that are based on realistic and thought provoking situations. This course stimulates students’ self confidence, self esteem and pride in achievement through enabling them to reach personal success.

 

DVC is taught through to Year 13 level and further study is available at Technical Institutes and Universities in such areas as architecture, graphics design, engineering, interior design, advertising, computer graphics etc.

Students will have the opportunity to gain 6 credits in NCEA Level 1 towards Technology, Visual Arts, Graphics and Design.

 

Year 10 Food Technology

 

This course involves using technological practice to develop food solutions that meet a design brief. You will co-construct your focus area and develop your own design brief. You will have the opportunity to work individually or as a member of a team working on a small group design brief. You will have to design, develop and test your ideas until you find a solution to meet your brief.

 

You will develop skills to become a supportive team player able to undertake research accessing a variety of sources. You will be able to produce written and practical evidence to support your development work.

The variety of skills you will learn at Year 10 Food Technology lead smoothly on to Year 11 and beyond.

Year 10 Hard Materials Technology

 

This course involves working within a context to develop technological products. It builds on the Year 9 General Technology Course. You will generate ideas that will allow you to develop a range of outcomes. In the development of your ideas you will be investigating existing products to identify the key attributes that make products successful. You will make mockups or models that can test your ideas, then use a range of hard materials to develop those ideas into a final outcome.

 

You will learn new skills and knowledge and develop strategies to embrace challenge. You will have the opportunities to work on individual projects and group projects.

 

You will have the opportunity to develop a wide range of skills and knowledge that will prepare you for NCEA Level 1, 2 and 3. There are many Technology related careers and University courses that have Technology as an entry subject. You will also have the opportunity to sit an NCEA Achievement Standard to gain credits as you work through one of your projects.

 

Year 10 Fashion and Design

 

This course involves developing a range of outcomes related to Fashion and Design. You will learn about the Fashion trends of the past and how they have influenced Fashion today. You will develop knowledge and skills to make items that meet a given Design Brief or Challenge following the Design Process.

 

You will explore who you are in a conceptual form and learn the skills of design, including looking at digital designing. You will then transfer these new design skills and look at ‘who you are’ to influence the design and making of a ‘personal item’. This will allow you to express yourself in a unique way, while also gaining fundamental design skills and more specialist construction skills.

 

You will conduct some research into your culture and heritage to find similar existing products, suitable materials and learn how to manipulate a range of different materials. After the introductory project you will be given the opportunity to Design and Make items suitable for a personal project or you may wish to get involved in a community project. Or enter a competition such as the local schools Wearable Arts Competition and/or the National Brother Design Stars Competition.

 

You will also have the opportunity to sit NCEA Achievement Standard 91060 Demonstrate understanding of basic concepts used to make products from textile materials or Achievement Standard 91045 Use planning tools to guide the technological development of an outcome to address a brief.

 

Year 10 Digital Technology (Electronics/Coding)

 

Digital technology is a University approved course and in secondary schools continues to Year 13. As this is a new, Year 10 option course for 2017 students and will begin with an introductory unit which will equip them with the required skills to proceed to programming and use of microcontrollers with the intended outcome of being able to design, manufacture and programme an autonomous robot.

 

The course will be project based, concentrating on enquiry learning and ‘learning by doing’ and will incorporate these areas of digital technology (as well as safe and competent use of workshop machinery and power tools)

  • Understanding of circuit design and electronic components
  • Using prototype boards to test and prove electronic circuit designs and programmes
  • Manufacture of electronic circuit boards and associated practical skills
  • Programming and use of microcontrollers with a practical outcome
  • 3D design using CAD (3D printing and laser cutting, if time allows)

 

The course is biased towards practical outcomes but students must be prepared to complete all areas of the course including theory and assignment work. Students who opt to take this course do not need any prior knowledge or experience of electronics or programming a willingness to learn and a strong work ethic is required. Students taking this course will have the opportunity to participate in relevant NCEA level one digital technology achievement standards.

 

Year 10 Drama

 

In Year 10 Drama you will build on some of the performance skills developed in Year 9 such as Drama Techniques, Drama Elements and Drama Conventions. You will work in groups to develop performance pieces and perform for students at MHJC and the wider community. There will be an opportunity to participate in an NCEA assessment and to prepare for option choices at Year 11.

 

You will learn to work with a wide range of people in various situations. You will develop your communication abilities and confidence in public forums. An interest in performance techniques and creating original work for an audience would be of benefit but these skills will be taught during the course so are not essential. Enthusiasm and a willingness to try everything are essential.

The skills acquired in Drama can be fed into any number of pathways. Being able to speak with confidence in a public situation is an invaluable asset in many other subject areas that involve discussion and presentation. Being able to work cooperatively and creatively in a group develops excellent problem solving skills that can be applied to many areas.

 

Year 10 Music

Year 10 Music will see a development of the skills learned in Year 9. Practical work will largely focus on group and solo performance as well as song composition. The course will involve an NCEA unit based on digital aspects of music using programs such as MuseScore and Ardour. You also will have the opportunity to record one of your own songs. There will be an element of the theory of minor and major scales and the investigation of chords in a key.


Learning to develop confidence when performing is a huge part of music at year 10 and plenty of opportunities, both formal and informal will be offered as an opportunity to shine.

 

Year 10 Spanish

 

Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages, there are more Spanish than English speakers in the world. There are over 350 million native speakers of Spanish in twenty two countries. The Year 10 Spanish course teaches not only a lively and expressive language, but a fascinating and different culture.

 

Students will have the opportunity to learn:

  • to describe themselves and others.
  • To describe places and other things.
  • to use articles and adjectives applying correct grammar.
  • to conjugate verbs with confidence.
  • about Spanish and Latin american lifestyle, festivities and traditions.


Our Year 10 Spanish students learn through;

  • videos and presentations
  • our language softwares “Linguascope and Language Perfect”
  • interacting within the class using their acquired, written, reading and speaking knowledge
  • experiencing field trips where they will apply their conversational skills.
  • being in contact through e-mails with Spanish speaking students, exchanging experiences and making friends overseas
  • having an opportunity of gaining 4 credits for NCEA Level 1and earning a Spanish Certificate in language competence from the Australian Council of Educational Research.

Learning Spanish will give students the possibility to understand other Latin based languages like Portuguese and Italian. Year 10 Spanish is a preparatory year to go further and study Spanish at a professional level giving you the chance of having a success.

 

Year 9 Options

Year 9 Options 2017

 

Please select 4 Option Subjects but you will only study 2. This is because some Options may not be offered if only a few students select it, or some Option course may be over subscribed.

 

Please note the following selection restriction that is applicable to the Technology Options, Languages and Visual Art/Design & Visual Communication.

 

Technology (Digital, Hard Material, Fabric, Food)

– students can select a maximum 1x technology subject within their first two choices

– students can select a maximum 1x technology subject within their two back up choices

 

Visual Arts and Design & Visual Communication

– students can select one of these subjects within their first two choices

 

Languages (Spanish, Mandarin)

– students can select one of these subjects within their first two choices

 

Year 9 Drama

In Year 9 Drama you will build on basic performance skills such Drama Techniques, Drama Elements and Drama Conventions. These skills will assist them in performing in a range of situations.

 

There will be an opportunity to create props and costumes for Drama. You will learn to work with a wide range of people in various situations. You will develop communication abilities and confidence when performing in public.

 

An interest in performance techniques and creating original work for an audience would be of benefit but these skills will be taught during the course so are not essential. Enthusiasm and a willingness to try everything are essential.

 

The skills acquired in Drama can be fed into any number of pathways. Being able to speak with confidence in a public situation is an invaluable asset in many other subject areas that involve discussion and presentation. Being able to work cooperatively and creatively in a group develops excellent problem solving skills that can be applied to many areas. There is a $10 charge associated with this course to cover materials for mask making.

 

Year 9 Music

 

In Year 9 Music you will develop as a musician on your chosen instrument. You will further develop your experience and skills in performance, both solo and in a group. You will learn to set up stage equipment such as speakers and mixing desks. You will also experience writing your own song. There will be an element of theory in terms of learning major and minor scales as well as working out chords in a key.

There will be a chance to use digital audio software to create original mixes.

Year 9 Mandarin

 

The Year 9 Mandarin course covers language and culture; exploring both modern and traditional aspects of China. Students will experience a variety of learning opportunities, such as stories, games, Chinese celebrations, Chinese history, Chinese culinary, Chinese craft and art, and school trips. Authentic learning experience and e-learning will be embed in daily lessons.   

 

Students will learn to

  • communicate with others with basic Chinese vocabulary
  • explore selected aspects of Chinese culture, history and customs
  • practice appropriate Chinese etiquette
  • retell traditional Chinese stories
  • describe their life at home and at school

 

This course is open to both native speakers of Mandarin and non-native speakers. It will cater for the needs of individual students and ensure they progress further in their own pathways.

Native speakers of Mandarin will

  • read texts with more complexity
  • write in a variety of genres and forms
  • master basic vocabulary at NCEA level one
  • Participate in cultural events and school trips

 

Year 9 Spanish

 

Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages, there are more Spanish speakers in the world than English speakers. There are over 350 million native speakers of Spanish in twenty two countries. The Year 9 Spanish course teaches not only a lively and expressive language, but a fascinating and different culture. Learning Spanish will provide the possibility to understand other Latin based languages like Portuguese and Italian.

 

Students will have the opportunity to learn:

  • to describe themselves and others
  • to use articles and adjectives applying correct grammar
  • about Spanish and Latin american lifestyle, festivities and traditions

 

Our Year 9 Spanish students learn through:

  • Videos and presentations
  • Our language softwares “Linguascope and Language Perfect” interacting within the class using their acquired, written, reading and speaking knowledge.
  • Experiencing field trips where they will apply their conversational skills and exchange with other spanish students from other schools in New Zealand.

 

Year 9 Visual Arts

 

Students will given opportunities to develop ideas, skills and techniques in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, design and time based art through a series of practical projects representing a variety of contexts.

 

Year 9 Visual Arts is for students who wish to:

  • develop creativity and individual self expression in visual art processes
  • acquire skills, knowledge and understanding of art through authentic pathways
  • develop a wide appreciation of the visual world and recognise their place in it

 

‘While Art continues to be a desirable option for students wishing to pursue ‘traditional’ creative careers, such as Architecture, Interior Design or Painting / Fine Art related professions, the internet has seen an explosion of exciting, new roles emerge.’

 

http://www.studentartguide.com/articles/reasons-to-study-art

 

Year 9 Graphics: Design and Visual Communication

Design and Visual Communication (DVC) is a main communication tool, it is an international language therefore, it enables students to show their ideas avoiding languages barriers.

DVC combines the important educational aspects of communication and creative problem solving. This course will give students the chance to develop their own solutions to realistic design problems through the application of a design process. They will also get the skills to precisely communicate their solutions, by applying a range of Graphics Modes:

  • Free hand sketching
  • Technical drawing
  • Graphics softwares

It is directly related to the dramatic technological developments that have occurred in today’s society, and involves fields such as:

  • Architecture
  • Environment
  • Engineering
  • Technological
  • Media
  • Packaging.

This is a course with the emphasis placed on creativity and individual choice, developed to meet the needs of today’s students and tomorrow’s citizens.

The programme is developed around briefs that are based on realistic and thought provoking situations. Students will use graphics skills to develop, record and communicate individual and innovative solutions in a variety of ways.

This course stimulates students’ self confidence, self esteem and pride in achievement through enabling them to reach personal success.

 

Year 9 Food Technology

 

This course involves using technological practice to develop food products that meet a design brief. You will have to design, develop and test your ideas until you find a solution to meet your brief.

 

You will learn to think creatively and to work independently. You will develop skills to become a supportive team player able to undertake research accessing a variety of sources. You will be able to produce written and practical evidence to support your development work.

 

The variety of skills learnt in Year 9 Food Technology lead smoothly on to Year 10 and beyond. These skills will help with production of work in other curriculum areas and problem solving skills, developed through the design briefs, will be of use across the curriculum.

 

Year 9 Hard Materials Technology

 

This course involves developing outcomes to meet a given brief. In the development of your outcome/s you will make models or mockups that will test your ideas prior to working through the construction process. You will have the opportunity to use a range of hard materials to produce your final outcome – choosing the best materials that will enable your outcome to be “fit for purpose”.

 

This course requires creative and critical thinking. You will enhance your patience, enthusiasm and ability to work individually and in a group.

 

The variety of skills and knowledge you develop will lead you into the Year 10 Technology course. You will also be able use the knowledge you develop in Technology in other curriculum areas.

 

Year 9 Digital Technology (Electronics/Coding)

 

Digital technology is a University approved course and in secondary schools continues to Year 13. This MHJC course will align to the digital technology section of the Technology Curriculum.

 

The course will be project based, concentrating on enquiry learning and ‘learning by doing’ and will incorporate these areas of digital technology (as well as safe and competent use of workshop machinery and power tools)

  • Understanding of circuit design and electronic components
  • Manufacture of electronic circuit boards and associated practical skills
  • Programming and use of microcontrollers
  • 3D design using CAD (3D printing and laser cutting)

 

The course is biased towards practical outcomes but students must be prepared to complete all areas of the course including theory and assignment work. Students who opt to take this course do not need any prior knowledge or experience of electronics or programming but a willingness to learn and a strong work ethic is required.

Year 9 – Fashion and Design

 

This course involves developing a range of outcomes related to Fashion and Design. You will learn about the Fashion trends of the past and how they have influenced Fashion today. You will develop knowledge and skills to make items that meet a given Design Brief or Challenge following the Design Process.

 

You will explore who you are in a conceptual form and learn the skills of design, including looking at digital designing. You will then transfer these new design skills and look at ‘who you are’ to influence the design of a ‘personal item’. This will allow you to express yourself in a unique way, while also gaining fundamental design skills and more specialist construction skills.

 

You will conduct some research into your culture and heritage to find similar existing products, suitable materials and learn how to manipulate a range of different materials. After the introductory project you will be given the opportunity to Design and Make items suitable for a personal project or you may wish to get involved in a community project. Or enter a competition such as the local schools Wearable Arts Competition and/or the National Brother Design Stars Competition.

 

Year 9 Media Studies

 

In Media Studies you will learn to explore media concepts with critical awareness and have practical experience in production work.

 

This course can give you essential skills and expertise as you progress to senior Media Studies, and beyond. You will develop the ability to communicate confidently as you work in production groups developing media products such as short films. You will develop flexibility, problem solving and openness to new ideas. You will experience “hands-on” use of technology such as cameras and digital editing software. You will be able to critically interpret a wide range of media.

 

Your group project experiences will enhance your problem solving skills and ability to use your creative skills to produce a finished

product to fit a brief.

 

Year 9 Social Enterprise

“What is Social Enterprise?

A social enterprise is a venture that uses a business model to create social and environmental value. Social enterprises generate income through trading products or services, and the majority of any revenues are reinvested back into their core mission. ” (Inspiring Stories)

Social Enterprise is ‘doing charity by doing trade’. A social enterprise company is any for profit or non-profit organisation that applies strategies to achieving philanthropic goals. Social enterprises would consider themselves to have social objectives.Social enterprises do not aim to offer any benefit to their investors, except where they believe that doing so will ultimately further their capacity to realise their philanthropic goals.

You will be involved in exciting project work and you can interact with people in New Zealand and around the world.

The Whanau

Our Whanau are central to everything we do at MHJC. They operate as communities, which promote effective learning, pastoral care and positive competition. Students will be allocated to a Whanau on entry to the school and will almost always remain as a part of that community. Staff may be moved between whanau where timetabling needs dictate.

Each of our Whanau represent an integral part of New Zealand; the Coast, Forest, Water and Mountains. These are represented in our logo by the 4 coloured koru, gold, green, blue and white.

Teachers may teach across more than one Whanau but will be aligned with a Whanau for activities, competitions and events. Students and staff both enter into the spirit of the Whanau community which provides a strong sense of fun, pride and belonging.

National Standards

What are the National Standards?

National Standards are a description of what all New Zealand students are expected to be able to do in reading, writing and mathematics in Years 1-8.

The National Standards have been developed by the Ministry of Education and subject experts.

They are being introduced to give teachers, your child and you a clear idea of where your child is at in reading, writing and mathematics. They tell you what your child needs to do next in their learning.

If your child is working at, or above the standards during Years 1-8 it means your child should be on track to finish secondary school with a qualification such as NCEA Level 2.

How will the teacher work out where your child is at?

The teachers in your child’s Whanau will use many different ways to ascertain where your child is at in reading, writing and mathematics. This will include:

  • using evidence from your child’s work,
  • using a range of formal tests and assessments,
  • classroom observations,
  • talking to your child about their learning,
  • your child assessing their own work and work of other students in their classes.

If your child needs more time to work towards the expected standard, the teachers will work with you and your child to help them achieve their next learning goals, with self-reflection and goal setting (completed following our Student-Led Conferences).

What will the assessment data be used for?

Teachers will use the standards in reading, writing and mathematics to:

  • inform their planning and teaching,
  • work out your child’s next steps and together with you, set goals for learning,
  • report clearly to you via our e-National Standard Reports twice a year about your child’s progress and achievement in relation to the standards.

When will the reporting be carried out?

In Terms 2 and 4, all Year 7 and 8 students will be assessed against the National Standards.

How well is your child doing?

Your child’s progress and achievement in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics will be reported using our Mission Heights Junior College ‘WAME’ (Working Towards, Achieved, Merit and Excellence).

Please note: the Achieved level is the standard we expect students to reach by the end of the year.

For more information…

Please visit the Ministry of Education parent information site…

Learners Timetable

At Mission Heights Junior College, students have five 60 minute sessions from Monday to Friday.

       Year 7 to 10 Timetable
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
8:30 – 9:30AM Session 1
9:35 – 10:35AM Session 2
10:35 – 10:55AM

Morning Tea

11:00 – 12:00PM Session 3
12:05 – 1:05PM Session 4
1:05 – 1:55PM

Lunch

2:00 – 3:00PM DEEP